We All Do It and We Need to Stop

You see an article drawing comparisons between the New Hampshire #pumpkinfest, where drunk and violent college kids destroyed property for no reason, and the protests in Ferguson, MO, sparked by the killing of an unarmed black teen, and the thoughts start swirling in your head.

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Beauty

I never grew up thinking I was beautiful. I couldn’t recall a time my parents told me I was, but it was vastly unimportant. I was told I was creative and smart and funny and these were the qualities I wanted to build upon in my youth.

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The Struggle of Taking Chances

I woke up crying this morning because I felt like a worthless piece of crap. I could hear cars outside being started and driving off while I was still in bed. I didn’t get out of it until after 11.

6 weeks ago I did what some have called a “brave” thing. Or stupid.

I quit my job with no other options lined up.

I was in a well-paid dead-end rut that I resolved was only good for providing me funds to do the things I wanted. For some people, that was enough, but for me it was an excuse to stay somewhere miserable. I was told it takes strength to leave something that gives security into what would essentially be a struggle and as I sit here typing, I’m having trouble finding and maintaining that strength.

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Hello Friends, Who’s #FeelingNuts?

I think I’m making this post more as a warning. There’s an organization called Check One Two who work to raise awareness for testicular cancer who’ve been rolling out a campaign a la the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge across social media. Sooooo, you know, if this happens to catch on there’s a horrible chance you’ll become susceptible to posts on your favorite websites of people grabbing their crotches and nominating their friends to do the same.

Celebs are already doing it!

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On How Attending a Predominantly White School Helped Me Get in Touch with My “Black Side”

Strange, right? You see, in high school where most of the kids in attendance were African American, I was constantly accused of “acting white.” That term, to this day, baffles me when I think of its [loose] definition:

Acting White: Essentially a non-white person who acts like a stereotypical Caucasian person regarding culture, speech and dress

The definition continues to say that particularly, my success in education denoted a form of “selling out” by betraying my culture. So doing well in school was bad for my black cred, or nah?

Oooookay…

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